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New Brunswick

New Brunswick is a founding province of Canada. Along with its neighbours Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island, it is one of the three Maritime provinces → read the story


The Queen Elizabeth Atrium

The Atrium off the Cockspur Street entrance to Canada House creates the opportunity to bring natural light into the heart of the building, to celebrate Canadian building products and design and to create a visual meeting space for High Commission staff → read the story


Joyce Majiski carpet artwork
Joyce Majiski carpet artwork

Yukon

Yukon comes from the Gwich’in word Yu-kun-ah, meaning ‘great river’ — the Yukon River that flows through the territory. It’s the westernmost of Canada’s territories, bordering Alaska and the icy Beaufort Sea, and a region of extremes — extreme temperatures and extreme beauty. The lowest temperature ever officially recorded in Canada and in North America is -63°C (-81.4°F) on 3 February 1947 at Snag, Yukon → read the story


Newfoundland and Labrador

Newfoundland and Labrador is where Canada sees its first sunrise. It is the youngest Canadian province, having entered the Canadian Confederation on 31 March 1949 → read the story


Quebec Room
Quebec Room

The Meeting Rooms of Canada House

In the autumn of 1864, three British Crown colonies — New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and the Province of Canada — came together, first in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island and then in Quebec City, to forge a new country. They sought protection from US invasion and the creation of more stable commercial markets. They were driven by their historic and cultural relationship with the UK and their mutual interest and respect → read the story


Pacific Room (detail)
Pacific Room (detail)

Beetle Mania

Pine beetle wood comes from lodgepole pine trees that have been infested by the mountain pine beetle, a longtime natural resident of British Columbia’s Interior forests → read the story


Emily Carr, Wood Interior, 1932-35
Emily Carr, Wood Interior, 1932-35

Artist Profile: Emily Carr

For 2015, Canada House presents Carr’s oil-on-canvas painting Wood Interior (1932-35). Graciously on loan from the Vancouver Art Gallery through the Emily Carr Trust, hopefully this is the first of many more opportunities to showcase Carr’s work in the years to come → read the story


The Neighbourhood Called ‘Little Canada’

When the magnificent Trafalgar Square and the Nelson Monument were first designed there were no plans for fountains. As you look across the square today it is as if the fountains you see have been there for ever → read the story