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British Columbia

Queen Victoria named British Columbia when it became a British colony in 1858. In 1871 it reached an agreement to join Canada as a province. Part of that agreement was the establishment of a transcontinental railway → read the story


Emily Carr, Wood Interior, 1932-35
Emily Carr, Wood Interior, 1932-35

Artist Profile: Emily Carr

For 2015, Canada House presents Carr’s oil-on-canvas painting Wood Interior (1932-35). Graciously on loan from the Vancouver Art Gallery through the Emily Carr Trust, hopefully this is the first of many more opportunities to showcase Carr’s work in the years to come → read the story


Canadian Women's Army Corps, World War II, celebrating VE Day
Canadian Women's Army Corps, World War II, celebrating VE Day

2–4 Cockspur Street: Canadian Military Headquarters (1939–1947)

On 1 July 1927, Thomas Bassett Macaulay, President of the Sun Life Assurance Company of Canada, laid the cornerstone of a new building at 2–4 Cockspur Street, immediately to the west of Canada House → read the story


Alberta

Named after Queen Victoria’s fourth daughter, Princess Louise Caroline Alberta, the province of Alberta was the ninth to join Confederation — just hours after Saskatchewan → read the story


Quebec Room
Quebec Room

The Meeting Rooms of Canada House

In the autumn of 1864, three British Crown colonies — New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and the Province of Canada — came together, first in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island and then in Quebec City, to forge a new country. They sought protection from US invasion and the creation of more stable commercial markets. They were driven by their historic and cultural relationship with the UK and their mutual interest and respect → read the story


The Queen Elizabeth Atrium

The Atrium off the Cockspur Street entrance to Canada House creates the opportunity to bring natural light into the heart of the building, to celebrate Canadian building products and design and to create a visual meeting space for High Commission staff → read the story


Ontario

Known as Upper Canada after the Constitution Act of 1791, Ontario is one of Canada’s four founding colonies. Canada’s most populous province, it is the ancestral home of the Ojibwa, Algonquin and Iroquois First Nations, among others. Its name is believed to mean ‘beautiful waters’ in the original Iroquoian → read the story