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HM Queen Elizabeth and Gordon Smith at the reopening of Canada House, February 2015

Artist Profile: Gordon Smith

In the summer of 2014, at the age of 94, Smith toured Canada House with High Commissioner Campbell. They spoke of the plans for the building as a way of representing Canada in the 21st century with its focus on Canada and Canadians. Inspired by the new vision for Canada House, Smith decided to create a special painting for the High Commission → read the story


Quebec

Once called Lower Canada, Quebec is one of the country’s four founding provinces. It is the heart of French culture in North America. As Canada’s largest province, it occupies an area about three times the size of France. Before European contact, Quebec
was inhabited by the Inuit, Algonquian and Iroquois First Nations. Its name comes from the Algonquian word kébec, meaning‘where the river narrows’ → read the story


Pacific Room (detail)
Pacific Room (detail)

Beetle Mania

Pine beetle wood comes from lodgepole pine trees that have been infested by the mountain pine beetle, a longtime natural resident of British Columbia’s Interior forests → read the story


Building Canada into Canada House

Over the decades Canada House has seen many adaptations to its architecture and interiors. In the newly renovated Canada House, every effort has been made to ensure that the building showcases Canada’s natural materials and craftsmanship, and tells a proud story of its provenance → read the story


Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan became a province in 1905. Its name is an adaptation of what the Cree called the great river that flows through the province, kisiskāciwani-sīpiy, which means ‘swift flowing river’. With its vast prairieland and seemingly limitless skies, the landscape creates a sense of boundless opportunity which has lured people from around the world to its borders. It has more hours of sunlight than any other province. Saskatchewan is Canada’s breadbasket → read the story


Quebec Room
Quebec Room

The Meeting Rooms of Canada House

In the autumn of 1864, three British Crown colonies — New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and the Province of Canada — came together, first in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island and then in Quebec City, to forge a new country. They sought protection from US invasion and the creation of more stable commercial markets. They were driven by their historic and cultural relationship with the UK and their mutual interest and respect → read the story