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The Neighbourhood Called ‘Little Canada’

When the magnificent Trafalgar Square and the Nelson Monument were first designed there were no plans for fountains. As you look across the square today it is as if the fountains you see have been there for ever → read the story


Trafalgar Square, circa 1890 (© The Francis Frith Collection)

Canada House: A History

Early in 1922, a Canadian tea merchant named Peter Larkin arrived in London. He was a natural marketer who had created Canada’s iconic Salada Tea brand and he set out to put a new face on Canada in the UK. From the time he was appointed High Commissioner to the United Kingdom on 10 February, by Prime Minister Mackenzie King, he was charged with consolidating all of Canada’s activities in Britain → read the story


Miriam Rudolph, My Winnipeg IV, 2013
Miriam Rudolph, My Winnipeg IV, 2013

Manitoba

In the language of the Cree First Nation, Manitoba means ‘where the spirit lives’. The province started to take its modern form when Thomas Douglas, the fifth Earl of Selkirk, used his money and political connections to purchase land and settle poor Scottish families in British North America. First, in 1803 he helped settlers from Scotland find homes in Prince Edward Island. In 1804, he focused on Upper Canada → read the story


Building Canada into Canada House

Over the decades Canada House has seen many adaptations to its architecture and interiors. In the newly renovated Canada House, every effort has been made to ensure that the building showcases Canada’s natural materials and craftsmanship, and tells a proud story of its provenance → read the story


Pacific Room (detail)
Pacific Room (detail)

Beetle Mania

Pine beetle wood comes from lodgepole pine trees that have been infested by the mountain pine beetle, a longtime natural resident of British Columbia’s Interior forests → read the story


Canadian Women's Army Corps, World War II, celebrating VE Day
Canadian Women's Army Corps, World War II, celebrating VE Day

2–4 Cockspur Street: Canadian Military Headquarters (1939–1947)

On 1 July 1927, Thomas Bassett Macaulay, President of the Sun Life Assurance Company of Canada, laid the cornerstone of a new building at 2–4 Cockspur Street, immediately to the west of Canada House → read the story


Northwest Territories

In Inuktitut the Northwest Territories are referred to as ‘Nunatsiaq’, which means ‘beautiful land’. Reaching for over 1.3 million square kilometres, it is home to the Great Bear Lake, the largest lake in Canada, and the Great Slave Lake, the deepest body of water in North America. The 1,738km-long Mackenzie River travels from deep in the heart of the continent to the Arctic Ocean, through the canyons of the Nahanni National Park Reserve (a UNESCO World Heritage Site) and the islands of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago → read the story


View of Trafalgar Square
View of Trafalgar Square

Canadian Roots in the Heart of London

From the 18th-century traders who met in Garraway’s coffee shop, to the poutine shops of Shoreditch, to the Governor of the Bank of England, and the CEO of the Royal Mail, Canadians have always been present in London → read the story