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Story Archive

The Neighbourhood Called ‘Little Canada’

When the magnificent Trafalgar Square and the Nelson Monument were first designed there were no plans for fountains. As you look across the square today it is as if the fountains you see have been there for ever → read the story


Alberta

Named after Queen Victoria’s fourth daughter, Princess Louise Caroline Alberta, the province of Alberta was the ninth to join Confederation — just hours after Saskatchewan → read the story


HM Queen Elizabeth and Gordon Smith at the reopening of Canada House, February 2015

Artist Profile: Gordon Smith

In the summer of 2014, at the age of 94, Smith toured Canada House with High Commissioner Campbell. They spoke of the plans for the building as a way of representing Canada in the 21st century with its focus on Canada and Canadians. Inspired by the new vision for Canada House, Smith decided to create a special painting for the High Commission → read the story


Pacific Room (detail)
Pacific Room (detail)

Beetle Mania

Pine beetle wood comes from lodgepole pine trees that have been infested by the mountain pine beetle, a longtime natural resident of British Columbia’s Interior forests → read the story


Welcome to Canada House

Canada House has been the centre of Canada’s presence in the UK from the time it was first envisioned by High Commissioner Peter Larkin almost 100 years ago → read the story


The Queen Elizabeth Atrium

The Atrium off the Cockspur Street entrance to Canada House creates the opportunity to bring natural light into the heart of the building, to celebrate Canadian building products and design and to create a visual meeting space for High Commission staff → read the story


Quebec

Once called Lower Canada, Quebec is one of the country’s four founding provinces. It is the heart of French culture in North America. As Canada’s largest province, it occupies an area about three times the size of France. Before European contact, Quebec
was inhabited by the Inuit, Algonquian and Iroquois First Nations. Its name comes from the Algonquian word kébec, meaning‘where the river narrows’ → read the story