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Story Archive

The Neighbourhood Called ‘Little Canada’

When the magnificent Trafalgar Square and the Nelson Monument were first designed there were no plans for fountains. As you look across the square today it is as if the fountains you see have been there for ever → read the story


Alberta

Named after Queen Victoria’s fourth daughter, Princess Louise Caroline Alberta, the province of Alberta was the ninth to join Confederation — just hours after Saskatchewan → read the story


HM Queen Elizabeth and Gordon Smith at the reopening of Canada House, February 2015

Artist Profile: Gordon Smith

In the summer of 2014, at the age of 94, Smith toured Canada House with High Commissioner Campbell. They spoke of the plans for the building as a way of representing Canada in the 21st century with its focus on Canada and Canadians. Inspired by the new vision for Canada House, Smith decided to create a special painting for the High Commission → read the story


The Queen Elizabeth Atrium

The Atrium off the Cockspur Street entrance to Canada House creates the opportunity to bring natural light into the heart of the building, to celebrate Canadian building products and design and to create a visual meeting space for High Commission staff → read the story


Carpet in Sir John A Macdonald Room by Sean William Randall
Sean William Randall's carpet design adorns the Sir John A Macdonald Room

The Canadian Carpet Ride

Look down as you walk through Canada House and you will see magnificent Canadian oak, marble and granite — and 29 bespoke carpets commissioned to showcase Canadian craftsmanship and artistry → read the story


Emily Carr, Wood Interior, 1932-35
Emily Carr, Wood Interior, 1932-35

Artist Profile: Emily Carr

For 2015, Canada House presents Carr’s oil-on-canvas painting Wood Interior (1932-35). Graciously on loan from the Vancouver Art Gallery through the Emily Carr Trust, hopefully this is the first of many more opportunities to showcase Carr’s work in the years to come → read the story


Nunavut

Nunavut is Canada’s newest territory. It was established on 1 April 1999. The Inuit languages (Inuktitut and Inuinnaqtun), English and French are all official languages of the territory. Nunavut means ‘our land’ and its dramatic landscape is both strikingly beautiful and rich in natural resources → read the story


Miriam Rudolph, My Winnipeg IV, 2013
Miriam Rudolph, My Winnipeg IV, 2013

Manitoba

In the language of the Cree First Nation, Manitoba means ‘where the spirit lives’. The province started to take its modern form when Thomas Douglas, the fifth Earl of Selkirk, used his money and political connections to purchase land and settle poor Scottish families in British North America. First, in 1803 he helped settlers from Scotland find homes in Prince Edward Island. In 1804, he focused on Upper Canada → read the story