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Canadian Women's Army Corps, World War II, celebrating VE Day
Canadian Women's Army Corps, World War II, celebrating VE Day

2–4 Cockspur Street: Canadian Military Headquarters (1939–1947)

On 1 July 1927, Thomas Bassett Macaulay, President of the Sun Life Assurance Company of Canada, laid the cornerstone of a new building at 2–4 Cockspur Street, immediately to the west of Canada House → read the story


British Columbia

Queen Victoria named British Columbia when it became a British colony in 1858. In 1871 it reached an agreement to join Canada as a province. Part of that agreement was the establishment of a transcontinental railway → read the story


Pacific Room (detail)
Pacific Room (detail)

Beetle Mania

Pine beetle wood comes from lodgepole pine trees that have been infested by the mountain pine beetle, a longtime natural resident of British Columbia’s Interior forests → read the story


Newfoundland and Labrador

Newfoundland and Labrador is where Canada sees its first sunrise. It is the youngest Canadian province, having entered the Canadian Confederation on 31 March 1949 → read the story


Miriam Rudolph, My Winnipeg IV, 2013
Miriam Rudolph, My Winnipeg IV, 2013

Manitoba

In the language of the Cree First Nation, Manitoba means ‘where the spirit lives’. The province started to take its modern form when Thomas Douglas, the fifth Earl of Selkirk, used his money and political connections to purchase land and settle poor Scottish families in British North America. First, in 1803 he helped settlers from Scotland find homes in Prince Edward Island. In 1804, he focused on Upper Canada → read the story


Arthur Lismer, Docks on the Bay of Fundy, 1943
Arthur Lismer, Docks on the Bay of Fundy, 1943

Artist Profile: Arthur Lismer

The Government of Nova Scotia, on behalf of the people of Nova Scotia, has graciously presented the High Commission with a long term loan courtesy of the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, of Lismer’s 1943 oil-on-canvas board Docks on the Bay of Fundy → read the story