Menu


Story Archive

Natural Light, Fresh Air and Open Offices

Focusing on natural light and fresh air as well as varied and welcoming meeting spaces, Canada House's layout and furnishings are designed to support a high level of interaction and productivity → read the story


Alberta

Named after Queen Victoria’s fourth daughter, Princess Louise Caroline Alberta, the province of Alberta was the ninth to join Confederation — just hours after Saskatchewan → read the story


Trafalgar Square, circa 1890 (© The Francis Frith Collection)

Canada House: A History

Early in 1922, a Canadian tea merchant named Peter Larkin arrived in London. He was a natural marketer who had created Canada’s iconic Salada Tea brand and he set out to put a new face on Canada in the UK. From the time he was appointed High Commissioner to the United Kingdom on 10 February, by Prime Minister Mackenzie King, he was charged with consolidating all of Canada’s activities in Britain → read the story


Architectural details
Architectural details

Architectural Heritage Shapes the City and the Square

Britain respects its architectural history as a prized asset, and nowhere more so than in London. The two buildings that form the western front of Trafalgar Square are the second oldest on the Square after St Martin-in-the-Fields → read the story


Quebec Room
Quebec Room

The Meeting Rooms of Canada House

In the autumn of 1864, three British Crown colonies — New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and the Province of Canada — came together, first in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island and then in Quebec City, to forge a new country. They sought protection from US invasion and the creation of more stable commercial markets. They were driven by their historic and cultural relationship with the UK and their mutual interest and respect → read the story


View of Trafalgar Square
View of Trafalgar Square

Canadian Roots in the Heart of London

From the 18th-century traders who met in Garraway’s coffee shop, to the poutine shops of Shoreditch, to the Governor of the Bank of England, and the CEO of the Royal Mail, Canadians have always been present in London → read the story


Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan became a province in 1905. Its name is an adaptation of what the Cree called the great river that flows through the province, kisiskāciwani-sīpiy, which means ‘swift flowing river’. With its vast prairieland and seemingly limitless skies, the landscape creates a sense of boundless opportunity which has lured people from around the world to its borders. It has more hours of sunlight than any other province. Saskatchewan is Canada’s breadbasket → read the story