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Newfoundland and Labrador

Newfoundland and Labrador is where Canada sees its first sunrise. It is the youngest Canadian province, having entered the Canadian Confederation on 31 March 1949 → read the story


Architectural details
Architectural details

Architectural Heritage Shapes the City and the Square

Britain respects its architectural history as a prized asset, and nowhere more so than in London. The two buildings that form the western front of Trafalgar Square are the second oldest on the Square after St Martin-in-the-Fields → read the story


Miriam Rudolph, My Winnipeg IV, 2013
Miriam Rudolph, My Winnipeg IV, 2013

Manitoba

In the language of the Cree First Nation, Manitoba means ‘where the spirit lives’. The province started to take its modern form when Thomas Douglas, the fifth Earl of Selkirk, used his money and political connections to purchase land and settle poor Scottish families in British North America. First, in 1803 he helped settlers from Scotland find homes in Prince Edward Island. In 1804, he focused on Upper Canada → read the story


Joyce Majiski carpet artwork
Joyce Majiski carpet artwork

Yukon

Yukon comes from the Gwich’in word Yu-kun-ah, meaning ‘great river’ — the Yukon River that flows through the territory. It’s the westernmost of Canada’s territories, bordering Alaska and the icy Beaufort Sea, and a region of extremes — extreme temperatures and extreme beauty. The lowest temperature ever officially recorded in Canada and in North America is -63°C (-81.4°F) on 3 February 1947 at Snag, Yukon → read the story


Quebec Room
Quebec Room

The Meeting Rooms of Canada House

In the autumn of 1864, three British Crown colonies — New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and the Province of Canada — came together, first in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island and then in Quebec City, to forge a new country. They sought protection from US invasion and the creation of more stable commercial markets. They were driven by their historic and cultural relationship with the UK and their mutual interest and respect → read the story


British Columbia

Queen Victoria named British Columbia when it became a British colony in 1858. In 1871 it reached an agreement to join Canada as a province. Part of that agreement was the establishment of a transcontinental railway → read the story