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Story Archive

Arthur Lismer, Docks on the Bay of Fundy, 1943
Arthur Lismer, Docks on the Bay of Fundy, 1943

Artist Profile: Arthur Lismer

The Government of Nova Scotia, on behalf of the people of Nova Scotia, has graciously presented the High Commission with a long term loan courtesy of the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, of Lismer’s 1943 oil-on-canvas board Docks on the Bay of Fundy → read the story


Miriam Rudolph, My Winnipeg IV, 2013
Miriam Rudolph, My Winnipeg IV, 2013

Manitoba

In the language of the Cree First Nation, Manitoba means ‘where the spirit lives’. The province started to take its modern form when Thomas Douglas, the fifth Earl of Selkirk, used his money and political connections to purchase land and settle poor Scottish families in British North America. First, in 1803 he helped settlers from Scotland find homes in Prince Edward Island. In 1804, he focused on Upper Canada → read the story


Nova Scotia

Surrounded by the Bay of Fundy, the Gulf of St Lawrence, the Gulf of Maine and the Atlantic, Nova Scotia is defined by the sea. You are never far from water, whether exploring the rugged coastal cliffs and wide sandy beaches, or inland, where vast stretches of pine forest are punctuated by lakes and spectacular waterfalls. The French were first to arrive from Europe. They settled alongside the indigenous Mi’kmaq and named the island peninsula Acadia → read the story


Carpet in Sir John A Macdonald Room by Sean William Randall
Sean William Randall's carpet design adorns the Sir John A Macdonald Room

The Canadian Carpet Ride

Look down as you walk through Canada House and you will see magnificent Canadian oak, marble and granite — and 29 bespoke carpets commissioned to showcase Canadian craftsmanship and artistry → read the story


British Columbia

Queen Victoria named British Columbia when it became a British colony in 1858. In 1871 it reached an agreement to join Canada as a province. Part of that agreement was the establishment of a transcontinental railway → read the story


Trafalgar Square, circa 1890 (© The Francis Frith Collection)

Canada House: A History

Early in 1922, a Canadian tea merchant named Peter Larkin arrived in London. He was a natural marketer who had created Canada’s iconic Salada Tea brand and he set out to put a new face on Canada in the UK. From the time he was appointed High Commissioner to the United Kingdom on 10 February, by Prime Minister Mackenzie King, he was charged with consolidating all of Canada’s activities in Britain → read the story


Northwest Territories

In Inuktitut the Northwest Territories are referred to as ‘Nunatsiaq’, which means ‘beautiful land’. Reaching for over 1.3 million square kilometres, it is home to the Great Bear Lake, the largest lake in Canada, and the Great Slave Lake, the deepest body of water in North America. The 1,738km-long Mackenzie River travels from deep in the heart of the continent to the Arctic Ocean, through the canyons of the Nahanni National Park Reserve (a UNESCO World Heritage Site) and the islands of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago → read the story